artifactotum
hatching Cadbury Creme Eggs, part 4

A Cadbury Mini Creme Egg, this time:

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hatching Cadbury Creme Eggs, part 3

This embryo turned out rather different… I think it’s about half as old as the previous two, but it looks as though its genetics might differ slightly, too:

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hatching Cadbury Creme Eggs, part 2, cont’d

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hatching Cadbury Creme Eggs, part 2

Another embryo was opened last night.  This hatchling appears different from the first one… the variation might result from a different fertilization process, or it might just be a natural result of the process of incubating these eggs:

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hatching Cadbury Creme Eggs, part 1A

Here are some more photos of the first embryo:

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hatching Cadbury eggs

The question has stood for some time: what would happen if someone incubated a Cadbury Creme Egg?

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The Cadbury eggs on sale in stores are nearly always unfertilized.  At most, there’s the occasional blood spot on the yolk.  But nothing more.

Until now.

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Fertilizing these eggs involved a complicated lab process, and is outside the scope of this discussion*.

Fertilized eggs were incubated very carefully.  The process requires finesse: too cold, and the embryo doesn’t develop; too hot, and the chocolate melts.

Several fertilized eggs were incubated for a length of time between 4 days and 14 days.  Each of the eggs should contain a developed embryo**.  Here’s the first:


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More pictures are forthcoming.

*Frankly, this is backyard-meth-lab-style science.  I don’t know what I’m doing, but it seems to be working so far (except see below note).

**Unfortunately, none of the embryos are viable.  There’s something about the creme or the process or the fact that precludes ending up with living creatures.  I think that’s for the best.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE INANIMATE OBJECT?

it is you, tumblrbot.

Brass crab, repaired (sort of).

Brass crab, repaired (sort of).